finishing up

The game “scarred” that I have been developing over the last 8 months or so is finally rapping up and this will be the biggest project that I have ever followed through to completion.

This means that this project is the first time I get into some hard Debugging and creating those finishing touches that takes a game from amateur to polished and they are more than a little difficult.

I am currently working on a good credits sequence that honours everyone that has worked on the game, which is why I am doing the kinds of portraits you see above.

Sinister Livingroom

I haven’t really worked with the colour red for the vignettes, so I wanted to create an indoor scene with that colour as a centrepiece.

I also wanted to create some modernist furniture, however, the combination of those two elements mean that the game came out looking just a bit more sinister than I thought it would… I still like it though.

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Nature scene

I don’t usually work with nature scenes, mostly because I usually don’t do well with them. Never the less I decided to try something out today.

I think this particular vignette shows some promise, which is good because the shadows of a universe in which these vignettes exist is starting to take place. 016

Vignettes

I have been enjoying the summer as of late and as a part of that I have decided to start each day with these 1 hour vignette challenges. Unlike most of my projects, these vignettes don’t have a project that they are attached to, rather they exist independently of one another, but in the same visual universe.

I don’t know if there is a game here, but there might be, for now I am just having fun in blender 3D

Finally out of Alpha

Screenshot 2017-09-02 21.11.30.png

I have been working on the chain broke steadily for just about 8 months and I have finally made it ou of alpha!!!

What does that mean?

well, it means that I have a finished game. A buggy, narratively broke, kinda boring game, certainly, but a finished game none the less. I could release this game tomorrow, if I wanted to, I don’t though.

I am going to be spending the next 5 months, getting the game into BETA and polishing it to near perfection.

Update on development

one of the major problems with development, is the amount fo work that is required to make anything work.

Truly any and all things take a herculean amount of effort and no matter how many games you have made previously, you always end up under estimating the kind of work that is required of you.

That is why I have not been updating the blog in a couple of months, not because I have not been working (believe me, I have been working), but because the amount of work that I had ahead of me was kind of staggering.

I am happy to announce that I am almost ready with the beta of the game and while it is still somewhat boring, the game is looking up.

I have given myself 5 months to get from somewhat boring beta to amazing and fun release.

for now though, I just have to work and work and work until I have a finished game.

The challenge of simplicity

When I started The chain broke, I did so, knowing that I wanted to make something simple and easy to work with. Little did I know that simplicity is one of the most difficult thing to attain.

This is the problem with projects that are done well, they make everything seem effortless. I looked at projects like “Lara croft: go” or “Grow home” and thought, how hard can it be to get that style…

very hard as it turns out.

This mini rant on the complexities of simplicity comes on the back of a week where I have been doing nothing but trying to build a cantina for the game and failing miserably.

All of this griping should however not reflect on my want to finish the game. I am in this until the bitter end, sometimes it is just nice to vent.

god dammit

Indie dev is a bitch. I think most of us who are working in the industry can agree that it is as annoying an industry as it is an enchanted one in which to work.

That being said, there is nothing more annoying than the small things.

While taxes, pitch meetings and money stuff in genereal is a bitch to have to deal with and specs, frame-rate issues and bugs are a pain, nothing can get you down on a daily basis quite like forgetting your mouse at home.

I work from home mostly, but when I have the chance I like to go away from my house to get some work done, which is why I pounce at the chance to house sit every opportunity I get.

However, with a 30 minute walk behind me, it is a bit of a heart break when you realise that you have reached your destination, all ready to work and found out that you have forgotten your damn mouse… God dammit!

The workspace of an indiedec

There are very few things that are as important to the creative process ad the surroundings in which you work. I dont know if that is a universally true, but it is true for me.

I have personally worked in allot of different environments; everything from an incubation environment to a School setting has been my workspace and i have loved most of them.

However, currently i am working in almost complete seclusion from home. I can’t say that this is my favorite way of working, but it is certainly the cheapest way of making a game.

Never the less, if i can afford an actual office in the future, i will jump at the opportunity!