The difficulties of worldbuilding

I have reached an interesting part in the development of “The chain broke” where I am going from answering how something is happening to why it’s happening. This might sound very arty farty (pun intended), but it really isn’t.

Up until this point I have been focussed on how the characters of my game survive given the circumstances under which they live and now I am going into explaining how those circumstances came about. I am, of cause, being purposefully vague here, because I want you to play the game and find out all of the gory details for your selves, but suffice it to say some stuff went down and now I am exploring just what happened.

Surprisingly, I am finding it a bit harder to define the why of everything, than I did the how. Creating the world after everything had gone down was, for whatever reason, quite a bit easier for me than I thought it would be, which is probably why I am struggling now.

However, I will not let that get me down, I have a game to make and damnit if I am not going to finish it.

unprepared for success

I want to state, at the start of this blog post, that I have no delusions of grandeur when it comes to “the chain broke”. I know that in all likelihood, this game will fall by the waysaide, as there are allot of indie titles that are released every day and allot of those are better than the game that I am working on.

In fact, I am pretty well prepared for this game to fizzle. I am prepared for the game to come out and be ignored by everyone but my friends and my family. I have made piece with the fact that simply finishing the game means that I have a succesfull title.

This, however, means that I have no idea how to handle myself if this turns out to be even moderately succesfull. In fact, I won’t be able to know what to do, if people actually start paying attention to me and my work. I am, as the title states, completely unprepared for success.

The only thing that sates me currently is that fact that I probably won’t be succesfull. As it stands, I will sell a couple fo copies and then the game will wort of disappear into the either.

kicking it at sea level

I think most indie developers (assuming that they are full time) can attest to the money problem that come with devoting your life to something you love as much as video games.

it is fair to say that I love video games to an almost unhealthy degree. Even though I am completely broke, I spend most of my money on games and I make sure that the job that I hold allows me time to devote to development.

In fact, I let the whimsey of videogame development control most of my life, despite that fact that I have never made any money off of my own games.

That said, I can’t imagine allot of indie dev make games for the cash of the thing, since I know more broke developers than I know ones with work. I think, we as a species, have devoted ourselves to this interactive business and the love of the things carries us through, even when we have to eat ramen for every meal.

One of the main workshops

I am still toiling away at “The chain broke” which is coming along at a steady, if slow, pace. The problem with game development, is that you simply don’t know if what you are creating is any good while you are in it.

This means that I could be working on a god awful piece of crap and I would not know it, not until I am done with it that is. Right now my motivation is somewhere between stubbornness and blind faith that this game is worthwhile.

I am currently working on one of the main workshops that are in the game. This is where the food id being produced for the prisoners and is a very important part of the game.

This means that there is added pressure to do it right, luckily, I am in no rush, so I believe that I can get this to work.