Holo

I have been working on creating a mechanic that will hold the attention of my guards for a couple of seconds while Re80 sneaks by and have been having a hell of a time with it.

As it turns out, there are very few things that a robot sill stop for and even fewer of those make sense within the context of my game.

I considered an EMP mine, which would shut them down temporarily, but that seemed needlessly aggressive and I wanted to keep the game non violent.

I considered a screen at which you could hack the robots, but that came with the implication that Re80 had been able to do this the whole time, so why didn’t she start with that.

I considered a tesla coil, which would keep the robots insnared by its tendrils of electricity, but somehow, enslaving a race of robots seems like an off thing for a former slave/prisoner to do.

So in the end I decided that creating a hologram of herself to distract the robots probably was the most sensible thing to do in this situation. However, I still enjoyed the time I spent trying to figure out the problem of what stops a robot dead in its tracks.

kicking it at sea level

I think most indie developers (assuming that they are full time) can attest to the money problem that come with devoting your life to something you love as much as video games.

it is fair to say that I love video games to an almost unhealthy degree. Even though I am completely broke, I spend most of my money on games and I make sure that the job that I hold allows me time to devote to development.

In fact, I let the whimsey of videogame development control most of my life, despite that fact that I have never made any money off of my own games.

That said, I can’t imagine allot of indie dev make games for the cash of the thing, since I know more broke developers than I know ones with work. I think, we as a species, have devoted ourselves to this interactive business and the love of the things carries us through, even when we have to eat ramen for every meal.

One of the main workshops

I am still toiling away at “The chain broke” which is coming along at a steady, if slow, pace. The problem with game development, is that you simply don’t know if what you are creating is any good while you are in it.

This means that I could be working on a god awful piece of crap and I would not know it, not until I am done with it that is. Right now my motivation is somewhere between stubbornness and blind faith that this game is worthwhile.

I am currently working on one of the main workshops that are in the game. This is where the food id being produced for the prisoners and is a very important part of the game.

This means that there is added pressure to do it right, luckily, I am in no rush, so I believe that I can get this to work.