The challenge of simplicity

When I started The chain broke, I did so, knowing that I wanted to make something simple and easy to work with. Little did I know that simplicity is one of the most difficult thing to attain.

This is the problem with projects that are done well, they make everything seem effortless. I looked at projects like “Lara croft: go” or “Grow home” and thought, how hard can it be to get that style…

very hard as it turns out.

This mini rant on the complexities of simplicity comes on the back of a week where I have been doing nothing but trying to build a cantina for the game and failing miserably.

All of this griping should however not reflect on my want to finish the game. I am in this until the bitter end, sometimes it is just nice to vent.

Officially half way

When working on videogames, project fatigue is a real problem that does need to be combatted at every turn.

You start out a project all excited and ambitious. There is nothing that your game cannot do and nothing that it cannot be. This is probably the best part of making videogames, the open and delightful place where every opportunity is available to you.

and then it starts; the long arduous task of actually making the game. All of a sudden your game has to move from great idea to awesome game. You have to think about things like visual design, audio design and story beats. You lose yourself in questions of color choices and fps count and you can no longer tell if what you are making is any good at all.

This is when project fatigue starts up. You can no longer tell if you game is good or not, you can no longer tell if anything is any good and you start question everything about the game down to it’s core principles.

At this stage you can do nothing but take your successes where they come and today I found such a success.

I am now officially half way. I have reached the threshold that means that I have finished 50% of the levels that are in the game and that is awesome.

Now, bear with me, as I attempt top finish the rest.

The difficulties of worldbuilding

I have reached an interesting part in the development of “The chain broke” where I am going from answering how something is happening to why it’s happening. This might sound very arty farty (pun intended), but it really isn’t.

Up until this point I have been focussed on how the characters of my game survive given the circumstances under which they live and now I am going into explaining how those circumstances came about. I am, of cause, being purposefully vague here, because I want you to play the game and find out all of the gory details for your selves, but suffice it to say some stuff went down and now I am exploring just what happened.

Surprisingly, I am finding it a bit harder to define the why of everything, than I did the how. Creating the world after everything had gone down was, for whatever reason, quite a bit easier for me than I thought it would be, which is probably why I am struggling now.

However, I will not let that get me down, I have a game to make and damnit if I am not going to finish it.