Holo

I have been working on creating a mechanic that will hold the attention of my guards for a couple of seconds while Re80 sneaks by and have been having a hell of a time with it.

As it turns out, there are very few things that a robot sill stop for and even fewer of those make sense within the context of my game.

I considered an EMP mine, which would shut them down temporarily, but that seemed needlessly aggressive and I wanted to keep the game non violent.

I considered a screen at which you could hack the robots, but that came with the implication that Re80 had been able to do this the whole time, so why didn’t she start with that.

I considered a tesla coil, which would keep the robots insnared by its tendrils of electricity, but somehow, enslaving a race of robots seems like an off thing for a former slave/prisoner to do.

So in the end I decided that creating a hologram of herself to distract the robots probably was the most sensible thing to do in this situation. However, I still enjoyed the time I spent trying to figure out the problem of what stops a robot dead in its tracks.

War, what is it good for?

One of the interesting challenges that I have to face with this project is the question of combat.

Now I have taken a pretty clear stance on the matter; there will be no combat in the chain broke, but as the game is set in a world directly following a major global conflict, I find myself having to but weapons in my game regardless.

This proves an interesting challenge for me as a designer, how to put a gun in tha game and then tell the player that he/she cannot use it.

I don’t know the answer quite yet, but I will figure it out… I at least hope so.

The challenge of simplicity

When I started The chain broke, I did so, knowing that I wanted to make something simple and easy to work with. Little did I know that simplicity is one of the most difficult thing to attain.

This is the problem with projects that are done well, they make everything seem effortless. I looked at projects like “Lara croft: go” or “Grow home” and thought, how hard can it be to get that style…

very hard as it turns out.

This mini rant on the complexities of simplicity comes on the back of a week where I have been doing nothing but trying to build a cantina for the game and failing miserably.

All of this griping should however not reflect on my want to finish the game. I am in this until the bitter end, sometimes it is just nice to vent.

god dammit

Indie dev is a bitch. I think most of us who are working in the industry can agree that it is as annoying an industry as it is an enchanted one in which to work.

That being said, there is nothing more annoying than the small things.

While taxes, pitch meetings and money stuff in genereal is a bitch to have to deal with and specs, frame-rate issues and bugs are a pain, nothing can get you down on a daily basis quite like forgetting your mouse at home.

I work from home mostly, but when I have the chance I like to go away from my house to get some work done, which is why I pounce at the chance to house sit every opportunity I get.

However, with a 30 minute walk behind me, it is a bit of a heart break when you realise that you have reached your destination, all ready to work and found out that you have forgotten your damn mouse… God dammit!

Officially half way

When working on videogames, project fatigue is a real problem that does need to be combatted at every turn.

You start out a project all excited and ambitious. There is nothing that your game cannot do and nothing that it cannot be. This is probably the best part of making videogames, the open and delightful place where every opportunity is available to you.

and then it starts; the long arduous task of actually making the game. All of a sudden your game has to move from great idea to awesome game. You have to think about things like visual design, audio design and story beats. You lose yourself in questions of color choices and fps count and you can no longer tell if what you are making is any good at all.

This is when project fatigue starts up. You can no longer tell if you game is good or not, you can no longer tell if anything is any good and you start question everything about the game down to it’s core principles.

At this stage you can do nothing but take your successes where they come and today I found such a success.

I am now officially half way. I have reached the threshold that means that I have finished 50% of the levels that are in the game and that is awesome.

Now, bear with me, as I attempt top finish the rest.